Effective Learning Orginization

Peter Senge made clear in his seminal book The Fifth Discipline that, in the long run, the only sustainable competitive advantage an organization has is its ability to learn faster than its competition. Here are some key benefits of a learning organization:

-Maintaining levels of innovation and remaining competitive

-Being better placed to respond to external pressures

-Having the knowledge to better link resources to customer needs

-Improving quality of outputs at all levels

-Becoming more people-oriented

-Increasing the pace of change within the organization

 

Changing the Learning Curve with a Spirit of Excellence Series

Key competency: Excellence in Building an Effective Learning Orginization

 

Seminar 1: Effective Learning Orginization:

An Overview

Seminar 2: Effective Learning Orginization:

10 Transformational Steps

Seminar 3: Imagining the Future:

Practice of Practical Innovation

 

Seminar 1: Effective Learning Orginization:

An Overview

The emergence of the idea of the “learning organization” is wrapped up with notions such as “the learning society.” Perhaps the defining contribution here was made by Donald Schon, who provided a theoretical framework linking the experience of living in a situation of increasing change with the need for learning. It was in this context that, in 1990, Peter Seng began to explore “the art and practice of the learning organization.” According to Senge, a learning organization exhibits five main characteristics: systems thinking, personal mastery, mental models, a shared vision, and team learning. This session will give a general overview of each of the characteristics in an interactive and memorable way.

 

Seminar 2: Effective Learning Orginization:

10 Trasformational Steps

While there are many academic books about brain-compatible learning, systems thinking, communication, organizational and cultural change, and multiple intelligences, this seminar has integrated them practically. “Learning Organization in 10 Steps” offers a clear, practical guide to mastering and directing the critical learning process for organizational growth and transformation. Senge's The Fifth Discipline provided the theory. This workshop provides the multipurpose guide and tools to turn every institution into a vital contributor for all of its stakeholders.

 

Seminar 3: Imagining the Future:

Practice of Practical Innovation

Innovation is a learned, process-based skill. Genuine innovation is a continuous process of mindset formation. Many training programs reduce innovation to a convenient set of rules and regulations to follow. Often this results in people going through the motions without true understanding. This does not produce excellence in long-term effectiveness. Training for innovation must combine putting both theoretical and learned skills into practice.

Imagining the Future:

Practice of Practical Innovation

is designed based on research conducted by Jeffrey H. Dyer, Hal B. Gregersen, and Clayton M. Christensen from the Harvard Business School. Based on their research, the process of innovation has 5 specific components:

-Networking: gain radically different perspectives from individuals with diverse backgrounds

-Experimenting: try on new experiences & explore the world

-Observing: detect small details that suggest new ways of doing things

-Questioning: break the status quo & consider new possibilities

-Associating: enable innovators to successfully connect seemingly unrelated things

The program is designed to facilitate the process of innovation leadership mindset. Instead of simply telling learners what innovation is, which is ineffective for development, this is a program specifically crafted to enable participants to develop their own sense of the innovative process and its everyday application.

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